The MET Gets Punk’d

Punk'd

I am a story teller at heart. Yet, as much as I am a writer, I am a reader. I love to absorb stories and characters. I want to know the “why” and “how”. Without those two elements, a story falls flat.

“Tears, safety pins, rips all over the gaff, third rate tramp thing, that was purely really, lack of money. The arse of your pants falls out, you just use safety pins”
-Johnny Rotten of the Sex Pistols

I had walked through most of the Punk Chaos to Couture exhibit at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, when I had read that quote, plastered in white paint against the black wall. Against all odds, the graffiti, neon colors, and designer names had done little to capture my attention. It was only until I read Rotten’s quote that the designs came to life.

Today, we consider the people who don’t care to be hipster. They are the people who make the effort to stray from mainstream luxuries. In the 70s, there was no consciousness of rebellion or independence because it derived from poverty. Safety pins were a source of survival, a way to make keep your distressed clothing from tearing. It was fashion that interpreted survival as a form of expression. Hence, fashion is society’s greatest story teller. If you visit the exhibit, take the time to read between seams. Because once you know where fashion has been, you can understand how it got to be where it is now: from chaos to couture.